Reviews & Comments


Hi,

Feel free to email your book review or any comments to feedback@dmbooks.org 

Cheers,
David 







Review by Nicole Kessler 
Published on Sauce Ink style magazine

So, I haven’t been reading much oft late. Mostly magazines and light reads. Ever since I finished Angelology by Danielle Trussoni a few long months back, I haven’t been able to find a book that intrigued me enough to start reading again. Although I did try to start on a book recently, I just can’t seem to find the stamina to continue to the very end. So, it’s been banished to a corner of my bookshelf, collecting dust now. Then, David sent me an e-copy of his book Year of the Tiger.
I hardly read local books. I used to enjoy Rex Shelley’s books when I was in my teens and there was that book about SQ girls that had gotten so popular a few years back but that’s pretty much all I’ve read when it comes to Singapore literature.
Year of the Tiger caught me by surprise. The plot is refreshingly original and unsuspecting. First of all, I love a book that takes me back through the sands of time to the past. My cup of tea. Besides, I can never resist Thrillers. This particular one, took me back to World War II and deadly buried treasure hidden in an all but forgotten underground tunnel.
Reminded me straight off the bat of Egyptian pyramids, hidden gold and the curse upon the unfortunate who found it. What makes it so possibly realistic are the tunnels. I’ve always had a fascination with the mysterious underground tunnels that snake through Singapore. Built in World War II, a large part of the tunnels are closed off to the public and because of this, holds sort of an allure for me.
The curse spreads across neighbouring countries and soon becomes a global pandemic in the form of a deadly air borne disease.
Read the tragedy unfolding as unsuspecting men who just wanted a better life for themselves and their family, unknowingly awaken a rein of terror from World War II that eventually destroys the loved ones they seeked to protect.
A book that will keep you hooked and wondering what’s next!
PS: By the way, I’ve been asked to review books from a few local authors and I never write a review unless the plot of the book manages to draw me in.





Review by Suffian Hakim
Published in The New Paper (Singapore)


Most of the time writers with a journalistic background lean towards writing non-fiction books but David Miller, a former Straits Times journalist writes stories that are part fact part fiction.

      Set in Singapore, Year of the Tiger is a story about a group of foreign workers digging a tunnel under the Padang, stumbling across a treasure vault and activating a booby trap.
      On the surface, it seems to be nothing more than just a bio-terrorism thriller. However the book explores many deep-seated issues that plague Singapore and it captures the different facets of Singapore society. Miller has written a book which allows me to escape to a different and entertaining world, but still keeps me grounded since it is set in surroundings familiar to me.
      This book has earned a spot on a shelf I have at home which holds only the best books.


Review by Susan TanPublished on Lybrary.com

Set in Singapore, Year of the Tiger weaves an interesting tale, blending history and urban legends in a fast-paced fiction thriller. Imperial Japan which occupied Singapore and much of South East Asia during World War II looted much gold and other valuables. Some was sent back to Tokyo while others had to be hidden in secret when Japan's fate  in the war turned and it was impossible to send home its plundered wealth.

This treasure vault remained forgotten until workers in Singapore digging a tunnel uncovered it and unknowingly let loose an unknown strain of anthrax which the Japanese Army had used to protect its treasure.


Investigators searching for a cure are left to decipher a cryptic clue left behind while in the shadows, the hand of politics is quick to seize this opportunity for its own ends. Overall it was a most enjoyable read!


Rating on Lybrary 





Review by Scott Thomson

Published on Amazon.com

Year of the Tiger has proven itself to be one the best action thriller novels that I have come across in recent years.

It's fast paced and doesn't bore the reader with silly subplots that just slows down the story. The plot has been well conceived and even though it is a work a fiction, the book shows an enormous amount of research weaved into the story and clearly presented for the reader to digest.


Year of the Tiger essentially is centered on the sudden outbreak of deadly anthrax linked to secret war-time treasure found in Singapore. As investigators search for a cure, the story takes an unexpected turn.


There is certainly lots of history, politics and urban legends thrown into the mix which makes for a real page-turner.


Highly recommended!!!!


Rating on Amazon.com






Review by Darlene Harding
Published on Amazon.com

I really enjoyed reading this book. I felt like I was drawn into the past and present Singapore. I felt like I would like to visit someday.

The story begins with the Japanese Army hiding the spoils of war. General Yamashita leaves his brother-in-law Yasuji Naito to develop a biological weapon to protect the loot. Yasuji Nairobi develops a slightly altered DNA of anthrax and plants it in the rooms where the treasure is left. He also developed a antidote but many lives are lost because

the future investigators have trouble finding clues.

The future finds Muhammed and his fellow workers finding treasure and becoming infected by mutated anthrax. They spread it all over the world. I was hoping Muhammed and his

family would make it.Inspector Gerald Loh leads the investigation. He is very likable.
He is shown to be an intelligent but sometimes mistaken investigator. I was left wondering if Gerald and his wife Dana will be okay. You see Dana is pregnant and you think maybe the baby is infected.

I give this book 5 STARS. It was hard to put down. I love mystery and intrigue. This book had both. I hope to read more books by David Miller.


Rating on Amazon.com
 





Review by Lynn Luckey, Illinois,USA
Submitted via email

In Year of the Tiger, David Miller has created a fantastic journey through time and history. His marriage of historical facts of war and greed with a fictional tale of cryptic messages, political intrigue and bioterrorism makes for a phenomenal read.

Gold and other treasures stolen by the Japanese for their Emperor during their takeover of Singapore in WWII needed to be hidden until safe passage to Japan could be made by the powers that be. The secret treasure, protected by a Japanese-designed biological booby trap, lay dormant for seventy years.


A group of poor foreign workers struggling to support their families, discovered the hidden treasure vault in modern-day Singapore. In stealing some of the Emperor's gold, they escaped with more than their loot. The secret left over from WWII invades their bodies from the onset of their theft. It follows them through their journeys home spreading fear and starting a pandemic. Multiplying and mutating, this highly-contagious form of anthrax spreads throughout the globe.





Review by Violet Crush
Published on Amazon.com

My only reason for accepting this book for review was that it was set in Singapore. If you read my blog regularly you might know I don’t read many thrillers. It’s not that I don’t like them, it’s just that I don’t actively seek them. So if I’m just going to read a few thrillers every year, I’m glad Year of the Tiger was one of them.

This book in set in 2014 Singapore. When workers are digging for a tunnel in Singapore, they stumble upon a secret room filled with loot from the World War II. It’s a vault created by the Japanese and protected with a lethal virus that could affect hundreds of people very quickly. When the workers take the loot and flee Singapore, it creates an epidemic which can only be stopped or controlled if the mystery of the virus can be solved by the clues left by Japanese.


For me the plot itself is a big draw because along with the current story it also gives interesting information on the Japanese during the World War. It’s intriguing to imagine that a small and super developed city like Singapore could have so many secrets. I found the Singapore history and the presence of tunnels and secret rooms in modern-day Singapore fascinating, and because it intermingled seamlessly with the plot, I was one happy reader. Unfortunately I don’t know much about the Japanese occupation of Singapore and this book more or less gave me a teaser without reading like a history lesson. It made me want to study more about that particular time period. How many thrillers can you say that for?  This is also the kind of story that could turn out to be true a few years down the road. That kind of explains part of my fascination to the story.


The involvement of the Japanese in the whole affair makes me wonder how Japanese will react if there was truly a situation like this. I kind of imagine it would be pretty close to the book. As far as the writing goes – it works well for a thriller I guess.


When I was almost 90% finished with the book I wondered about the end, I was worried about how it was all going to tie up. For me the most important part in the thriller is the ending, It could make or break a book for me. Fortunately, the ending in this book was pretty good. In some parts it was a very simple solution but in some parts it was pretty complicated considering the scale and scope of the problem.


Overall, I really enjoyed the book and I hope there are more books written that are based in Singapore. I’m definitely looking forward to reading more David Miller books, especially if he writes about Singapore. For just 278 pages, ‘Year of the Tiger’ was throughly entertaining.


Rating on Amazon.com
 




Review by Kelly Yee, California, USA
Submitted via email


David Miller's Year of the Tiger kept me holding my breath! It involves a historical look at the deadly consequences that ensue when greed, secrecy, and government involvement mesh together in a thriller that captured my interest about the WWII days of Singapore.

The author did an excellent job of depicting the past as well as the future in his book using his extensive research of actual history and transforming it into a tale of haunting and possible destruction of civilization in this chilling story of bioterrorism.  Also, what is of interest to me is how the author  supplies the reader with references that one can search to learn more about Singapore's less known history.


The conclusion of Year of the Tiger is marvelously written, with an exciting open ending leading me to hope that there will be a sequel to follow. I anticipate future works from this aspiring and talented author.





Review by Beta Flying Frog
Published on Amazon.com

Year of the Tiger by David Miller is a very well thought out book. It has the structure and detailed information to make it truly believable. Yet it still maintains your interest and is not at all tedious to read.

On the contrary, it is a very readable book, and will keep your interest all the way through. What really amazed me most was that he managed to give you a great deal of information throughout the book, and still pulls out a surprise at the end.


Also, without using morbid details that could easily make this a horror book, he leaves us with haunting possibilities that will stay in my mind for some time to come.


The story has no gaping holes, and is written with expertise and style. It is truly a page turner, one of the best adventure books I've ever read.


I hope there will be a sequel, as I will be at the front of the line to read it. Thank you, David Miller, for a riveting story that was enjoyable to read!


Rating on Amazom.com
 





Review by Shannon Abby 
Published on Amazon.com

This book is an awesome read and I enjoyed every single word. The storyline got my attention immediately and I could not put the book down until I finished it. There are not too many books that pulls you in to the story so quickly as this book did. The story holds your interest throughout the book along with the characters and historically references and is a real pager turner. The end of the book had an interesting turn of events that may be too scary to think about. I would highly recommend this book to anyone who just loves to read! This is not the type of book I usually read but was recommended by a friend, I am sure glad I listened! I have just started the sequel, Advent and I am SO excited that there is another book to Year of the Tiger. Thank you so much David Miller. Please keep writing books - you are good!!!
Rating on Amazom.com 






Review by Linda E.  
Published on Amazon.com

I just finished reading Year of the Tiger and I must say that I loved it.  It is a fairly quick read and a thoroughly enjoyable one.

I have never read anything pertaining to this subject matter about Singapore or it's history.  I do tend to like to learn about new places and things and I found that there is a great deal I didn't know about this region and is history.

This is a fictional novel but it is based on facts such as the rumors of treasure hidden by the Japanese army during the war and the myriad of tunnels under this lovely city. Some built by the British and some built by the Japanese during WWII. The author, Mr Miller, is very knowledgeable about these subjects and it enhances the readers experience.  The story also delves into the frightening world of biological warfare and this is a very current issue we all are concerned about.
This novel makes me want to learn more and I will do so.  First, by following this book up with it's sequel,  Advent.  I cannot wait.

Rating on Amazom.com 





Review by Darlene  
Published on Amazon.com

I really enjoyed reading this book. I felt like I was drawn into
the past and present Singapore. I felt like I would like to visit
someday.

The story begins with the Japanese Army hiding the spoils of war. General Yamashita leaves his brother-in-law Yasuji Naito to develop a biological weapon to protect the loot. Yasuji  develops a slightly-altered DNA of anthrax
and plants it in the rooms where the treasure is left. He also developed a antidote but many lives are lost because the future investigators have trouble finding clues. I give this book 5 STARS. It was hard to put down. I love mystery
and intrigue. This book had both. I hope to read more books by
David Miller.

Rating on Amazom.com 





Review by Dominic S.A compelling read
Published on Angus & Robertson (Australia)

I loved this book from the first page - a gripping plot that sweeps he reader along from World War II to the present day.

While a work of fiction, it was historically well researched with a healthy dose of modern urban legends.


Year of the Tiger is certainly worth adding to your ebook library.


Rating on Angus & Robertson







Review by Lovelyloey
Published on reviewer's website

Set in 2014, Year of The Tiger is a speculative historical thriller predicated on missing treasures that were looted in World War II, and hidden beneath the Padang in Singapore under plain site. When the treasures were accidentally unearthed by a group of construction workers, a high lethal and infective anthrax strain was unleashed, resulting in worldwide panic not unlike past infections such as SARS and H1N1. The story revolves about Inspector Loh trying to curb the spread of the infection, solve the mystery of the treasures and look for a cure. ...

All in all, the novel was a good read; at 278 pages it is a little shorter than other relic novels. One thing for certain, this is fast-paced page-turner. As a relic thriller fan, I’d say this comes pretty close to what I think can be THE Singapore relic thriller. I hope this book can spark a new writing trend in Singapore; it’s high time!







Review by James N. - A class modern-day thriller
Published on Angus & Robertson (Australia)

This book examines probably one of the biggest mysteries from the Second World War - the legend of Yamashita's Gold.

The book meshes this mystery with a modern- day horror of bioterrorism for a page-turning read which will keep the reader wanting more.

I particularly loved the twist at the end - certainly didn't see that one coming!

This is a five-star novel by any standards.


Rating on Angus & Robertson
 







Review by Sapper 
Published on GoodReads.comn


I picked the book out cos I thought at first that it would be a historical fiction of the war in Asia. 

Still I wasn't disappointed that the bulk of the story was set in the present day.  I think that we do not give the Imperial Japanese Army enough of credit for their pioneering work on developing modern biological weapons especially anthrax despite the horrific way in which much of the research was done.  


The legend and the many stories of Yamashita's lost treasure is indeed an interesting premise for any book of the period. It would not be beyond reason for the Japanese to protect it with a biological weapon as related in Year of the Tiger.  Reading the website related to the novel, I am glad to note that there are still some die-hards out there searching for this lost treasure. 


I for one don't believe that Yamashita's Gold was ever removed from Singapore. The book does offer some clues as to where it may be and I hope that it could be found one day. The book was a great piece of writing, told cleverly with pace, accuracy and lots of research. 


I enjoyed the characters and personally I feel they were developed enough to suit their purpose in the story. Too often authors build their lead character making him out to be a super-hero who saves the day. I'm glad this book portrayed Gerard with warts and all as it made him more believable and likable.  


I'm not sure of the literary merits of the book. I'm just a normal reader but for me, the Tiger is a great fun adventure and one I would highly recommend.


 Rating on Goodreads.com
 






Review by Jarrod
Published on Goodreads

I must thank my friends here on goodreads for recommending this book as it certainly lived up to the hype.

Year of the Tiger had a great storyline lying somewhere between historical facts and intriguing fiction and this delightful blend makes this book an easy and interesting read.


Kudos to the author who focused on developing the main plot rather than on the molding of characters. They played their part for sure, but it is always the story that matters most to me. The mystery of Yamashita's gold is probably one of the best known questions that remain from that war in the Pacific. 


Even here in the US it has generated debate and much in the way of conspiracy theories over the decades. I'm glad that a writer from Asia has taken the facts and the fiction associated with this missing treasure and weaved it into a modern day thriller. I found the including of the popular press in the story was highly believable and added to the drama and the quick pace of the book.


I notice that many people here commented on the twist in the story towards the end and yes I was delighted too when I didn't see that coming.


Overall I felt that Year of the Tiger was a compelling read with lots of historical facts expertly weaved into a most engaging plot. I do hope this novel has a sequel and I for one can't wait to read it.



Rating on Goodreads.com  





Review by John Thomas
Published on Goodreads

It was the engaging plot and a fresh take on a mystery dating back to the Second World War that got me to pick up the Year of the Tiger.

As someone who has history flowing through his veins so to speak, I found that this unusual take on what happened to Yamashita's Treasure in the latter half of that war in the Pacific, to be both plausible and somewhat frightening. I can certainly appreciate the enormous research that was merged so seamlessly into the storyline giving the casual reader a quick history lesson complete with all the bells and whistles one would expect of an exceptional novel.


There are various levels to this novel which I guess while understood and appreciated by a vast majority of readers and fans, may still go over the heads of a "reviewer" or two but that is to be expected.


I particularly enjoyed the political dimensions of the plot which enhanced the pace of the story and set the tone for that juicy twist in the end. Well done!



Rating on Goodreads.com
 






Review by Dorothy
Published on Goodreads

I found the story angle interesting and it was well weaved in with history. While a work of fiction such a thing as the Japanese protecting their loot with a biological agent of sorts is possible as they did have the technology at the time and anthrax has a very long shelf life.

I've often wondered what became of Yamashita's gold. Much of it I'm sure was lost when the ships transporting the loot home to Japan were lost in military action at sea. Still I would like to think that at least some of it remains hidden waiting to be discovered and that's what I enjoyed most about Year of the Tiger. It certainly presents a possibility and the writing in good journalistic style was simple, clear and riveting.


The twist at the end was delightful leaving the reader wanting more. Overall a superb story and one I would highly recommend!!



Rating on Goodreads.com
 





Review by Jamieluv Bal, Singapore
Submitted via email

Year of the Tiger is  a well assembled bento box creatively laced 
with heaps of love, mystery, fiction & facts.

I truly enjoyed reading your book.









Review by Alvin of Alvinology published on his site.

David Miller is a former Straits Times journalist and I got to knew him while he was working in corporate communications after he had left Singapore Press Holdings.

He had spent ten years with the Straits Times crime desk and as a correspondent, he wrote a number of articles about the discovery of World War II tunnels on the Singapore mainland.


Year of the Tiger, inspired in part by the mystery surrounding long-forgotten war relics in Singapore, is his first novel.


The book was released last year in August and had remained on the top 10 International Bestsellers List at Kinokuniya Singapore between December 31, 2012 and August 1, 2013. Not bad for a Singapore book.


The book follows the spirit of Dan Brown‘s worldwide hit, The Da Vinci Code, and is a mixed of facts and fictions, spun into a mystery narrative.


Book Synopsis:

During the World War II, the Imperial Japanese Army under General Tomoyuki Yamashita looted untold amounts of gold and other valuables from across its occupied colonies in Southeast Asia to finance the empire’s ongoing military expansion. But when the tide of war turned against Japan in 1943, much of this treasure had to be buried in secret. Over the decades, the search for the legendary Yamshita’s Gold had been in vain, until now…

A group of foreign workers digging a tunnel under the Padang in present-day Singapore stumbles across a treasure vault and inadvertently triggers a biological booby trap. An unknown strain of anthrax is released threatening a global holocaust. It is up to Assistant Superintendent Gerald Loh of the Singapore Police Force to decipher a cryptic clue left behind with the loot to halt this deadly plague.


Year of the Tiger takes readers on a roller-coaster journey of political wrangling, murky history and secret organistions to discover the elusive cure for a seemingly unstoppable pandemic.


I like the idea and concept behind the book. Taking a narrative spin on Yamashita’s Gold is clever as the topic has always garnered keen historical interest globally. The very existence of the treasures remain debatable and is bound to get people excited to hunt it down in real life.  This will help the book reach out to an international audience instead of limiting to just Singapore readers.


With his journalistic background, David’s writing is clear and concise. Reading the book felt like reading an extended newspaper report, giving it a sense of realism that makes the story extremely believable. So much so that I find myself googling on many items in the book to find out if they were fact or fiction!


To move the story along on a broader narrative on War World II history, conspiracy theories and world crisis, less in-depth characterisation was afforded on the protagonists in the book.


Overall, the book was an enjoyable read for me. I would recommend it to history buffs, conspiracy theorists and general readers who are interested to find out more about the Japanese Occupation in Singapore.






Review by Linda E. 
Published on Amazon.com

I just finished reading Year of the Tiger and I must say that I loved it.  It is a fairly quick read and a thoroughly enjoyable one. 

I have never read anything pertaining to this subject matter about Singapore or it's history.  I do tend to like to learn about new places and things and I found that there is a great deal I didn't know about this region and is history.  


This is a fictional novel but it is based on facts such as the rumors of treasure hidden by the Japanese army during the war and the myriad of tunnels under this lovely city. Some built by the British and some built by the Japanese during WWII. The author, Mr Miller, is very knowledgeable about these subjects and it enhances the readers experience.  The story also delves into the frightening world of biological warfare and this is a very current issue we all are concerned about. 


This novel makes me want to learn more and I will do so.  First, by following this book up with it's sequel,  Advent.  I cannot wait.  



Thank You David for such an enjoyable read.

Rating on Amazon.com  






COMMENTS SUBMITTED VIA EMAIL (Email addresses withheld)

Took me a while to find your book in bookstores. Tried Times, Popular and MPH before I finally found a copy in Kino in Orchard. Anyway it was worth the search! Great book and cool weblinks - congrats
- Terrence


Just wanted to say I enjoyed the book and congrats on making it to Kino's Best Sellers List! Is there going to be a sequel?
- Jason Lee
[Reply by Author: Thanks Jason. No sequel planned for now. I'm working on another book at the moment. Will see how that goes. Cheers - David]


Enjoyed the story. Sorry to hear about Tequila but think it's wonderful that you dedicated the book to her. Take care!
- SJ
[Reply by Author: Much thanks SJ. Cheers - David]